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The Magic Quilt

INTRODUCTION

"The Magic Quilt" is part-story, part-play and partly a collection of rhymes - but also provides a jumping-off point for a host of other activities.  Originally, it was intended as a means of encouraging children to develop speaking skills.  It developed from there over the course of a term and has reached a (temporary?) conclusion.  Click here for ideas for using this resource in the classroom.

 

My thanks to Amanda Middleton and her Year 3 class at Maybury Primary School for  inspiring me to start on this project and for helping me with various rhymes etc.

 
 

CLICK HERE TO START THE STORY

 
 

How to start the quilt flying

 
 

CLICK HERE FOR PART TWO

 
  Do something more!     Tell me where to go.  
 

CLICK HERE FOR PART THREE

 
 

Words, words, words!     Keep flying     Find out about Spain

 
 

CLICK HERE FOR PART FOUR

 
  I will keep you safe     Find out about France     Be precise!     View of Paris     The Eiffel Tower  
 

CLICK HERE FOR PART FIVE

 
  Pick a place - quick!     The Louvre     Picture postcards  
 

CLICK HERE FOR PART SIX

 
 

Web links to Ancient Egypt

 
 

CLICK HERE FOR PART SEVEN

 
 

 
 

CLICK HERE FOR PART EIGHT

 
 

DO NOT STEAL     Solid rock

 
     

IDEAS FOR USING "THE MAGIC QUILT" IN THE CLASSROOM

 
 

CHARACTERS

The story is aimed at children aged approximately 7 - 9 years old.  The main characters, Sam and Lee, are named deliberately so that they can be either male or female.

 

 
 

DISPLAYING THE TEXT

The text of "The Magic Quilt" is intended to be displayed on an interactive white board so that everyone in the class can follow both the narrative and the play as well as view the various information pages.  It is a good idea to have a "monitor monitor" who sits at the computer and takes responsibility for scrolling the screen as needed.  (This is not an easy task and needs to be allocated to a proficient reader / computer user.)

 

 
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NARRATIVE

The narrative, which is intended to extend children's vocabulary, should be read by the teacher (or a very capable reader).

 

 
 

"PLAY" SECTIONS

The vocabulary used in the "play" sections has been kept simple deliberately so that it can be read aloud by 8-year-olds.  Having chosen two readers for the session, they could read their parts directly from the board.  However, I have found it useful to print out their scripts (and highlight them using a marker pen).  This enables "Sam" and "Lee" to stand at the front of the class facing their classmates, who can follow the script displayed behind the main players.

 

It may help less capable readers in particular if they are given a copy of the script in advance so that they can read it through in preparation.  It may be advantageous to "pair up" less confident readers so that they can encourage each other as they read in unison.

 

 
 

"JIGGLY" PATCH RHYMES

The rhymes on the quilt's patches are intended to be read by the class in unison.  It may be appropriate to discuss the meaning of each verse.  You may choose to spend a few moments looking at unfamiliar vocabulary - or picking out rhyming words.

 

 
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DESTINATION RHYMES

Although Sam and Lee write their own poems to tell the quilt of their chosen destination (with help from the pupils at Maybury Primary School in Hull), there is no reason why you should not encourage your class to write their own rhymes.

 

 
 

"FLYING THE QUILT"

In PART THREE, Sam and Lee discover that the quilt needs words to keep it going.  (They fail to reach their initial destination - Spain - because they cannot think of anything to say about it!)  In the classroom, you could encourage children call out what they know about a destination to see how long they can keep the quilt flying.

 

The teacher could use a symbolic quilt (I have used a board pointer - though it would obviously be more appropriate to use something made of fabric) which hovers higher or lower depending on whether the class can think of sufficient things to say.

 

Finding out about the destination could be a suitable homework assignment.

 

 
 

PICTURE POSTCARDS

The "picture postcards" in PART FIVE (collected by Sam and Lee when they visited The Louvre) could provide a stimulus for an art lesson - or for discussing what children think of each artwork.

 

 
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INFORMATION PAGES & LINKS to the WEB

The information pages have been kept simple but are designed to encourage enquiry.  I have included a number of links to external websites - each of which will open in a new window.  This should aid navigation as closing the window should return to the appropriate part of the story.